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Publisher Avatar Renzo Gracie posted

WORLD COMBAT CHAMPIONSHIP (1995) - Part 4


James Warring, born in Florida, had been a world boxing champion in the cruiserweight division for the NABF and the IBF. In addition, he was also an expert kickboxer. That night he had already defeated Jerome Turcan and Erik Paulson by knockout, who were on par with him in weight and size. 
 
It was time for Goliath to face his David. 
 
In the moments that preceded the fight, the commentators of the event declared their very strong impression of Renzo's performance, highlighting the effectiveness and mastery of his technique, something they had "never seen" before that tournament. "Renzo Gracie is unique: the most aggressive Jiu-Jitsu fighter in the world," said another expert. "Absolutely dominant, he brings the fight to himself." 
 
When the battle started, the size difference between Renzo and Warring screamed in the arena. 
 
Renzo took Warring down before any blows could be landed. 
 
On the ground, above the giant, he had the patience to conquer territory without precipitation. 
 
If the first match had the color of anger and the second the color of brutality, now what the audience was witnessing was a surgical fight – almost cold in its extreme technical calculation. Renzo rearranged the geometry of his legs several times, in a relational dynamic that responded to each of Warring's micromovements. As he gradually climbed the immense torso of the downed opponent, Renzo hit the boxer's face with occasional headbutts. In the front position, his chest now level with Warring's face, his arms behind his neck, Renzo promoted the choke with unbearable pressure on the back of his neck, which led James Warring to gave up at 2 minutes and 47 seconds.
 
After 3 battles in a row, all of them won in the first round with amazing efficiency, Renzo Gracie was consecrated as champion of the I WORLD COMBAT CHAMPIONSHIP - and with his victory, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (developed, taught and spread by the Gracie family, from of traditional Jiu-Jitsu from Japan) was positioned as the most powerful martial art style on the planet. 
 
"Renzo Gracie is an unbelievably talented man. His technique is very, very impressive... He's unbeatable. A phenomenon", was the comment that ended the broadcast of the event, before the championship belt was handed to Renzo by the boss of the organization, the dandy Christopher Peters. 
 
(The ambition to become one of the biggest MMA championships in the world did not materialize for the WCC: after fighting with his father, who had sponsored the event, Christopher was unable to continue the tournament. That was its first and last edition.) 
 
After this victory, using the money he received and taking advantage of the international projection of his name, Renzo moved with his family from Brazil to the United States, opening his first academy in New York, on 27th Street.

Publisher Avatar Renzo Gracie posted

WORLD COMBAT CHAMPIONSHIP (1995) - Part 3


In the mid-90s, tournaments brought an unimaginable peculiarity by the standards of our 21st century: as long as he won, a fighter would make a total of 3 fights in the same night, with just a few minutes of separation between them. This promoted a test of physical and mental resistance that today is considered inhuman. Well, those were different times: each round lasted 10 minutes, which already denotes the level of physical preparation required. 
 
In the semi-final Renzo's opponent was Phil Benedict, a burly Californian weighing 200 pounds whose style was wrestling. 
 
(It's important to point out another difference between tournaments then and now: Before, there was no weight division, and smaller fighters often faced much larger athletes.) 
 
Benedict's physical presence was intimidating: with a bodybuilder's shape, he bore a resemblance to famous Lou Ferrigno, who starred in the CBS TV series "The Incredible Hulk" from 1978 to 1982, playing the protagonist in his monstrous form.
 
But in addition to Benedict's physical bearing, something else caught the eye in the crowded arena: Renzo had the same killer look from the first fight, a laser intensity. "Total concentration, total focus," was what the impressed commentators at the event said. 
 
When the fight started, Renzo received a strong right hook. 
 
He didn't seem to be shaken. 
 
The standing exchange continued for about 1 minute, which startled those present, who were anticipating a fight that would instantly go to the ground. 
 
Renzo even received a knee to the face after an unsuccessful attempt to knock Benedict down by grabbing his left leg.
 
Punches from both sides continued, until Renzo managed to put Benedict down. In the first moments on the ground, Benedict landed a series of blows on the left side of Renzo's head, as well as on his ribs.
 
Renzo took the punches as he sought to advance, inch by inch, toward control of a position of superiority. With less than 2 minutes of combat, Renzo got a full mount.
 
Then it was time for the ground-and-pound: with his legs stabilized around Benedict's body, preventing him from getting up, Renzo raised his torso and started to deliver a sequence of punches, left and right, from top to bottom on Benedict's face, who was struggling to protect himself. In this position, the massacre continued for about 20 seconds, until the referee stopped the fight. 
 
Benedict's face was bleeding from multiple injuries, now a red mess. As he stood up, his arms raised in celebration of the victory, Renzo had a scarlet stain painted with the opponent's blood on his chest.
 
That shocking, fast (2 minutes and 8 seconds), arid and brutal fight had finally been the bridge to the dispute that awaited Renzo a few minutes later: the notorious James Warring, a giant of 6.2 ft and 220 pounds, who had demolished his opponents towards the final, was destined to be his tormentor or his victim.
 
 (to be continued)

Arm drag from half-guard

A versatile technique, the arm drag is here adapted by Gordo for the half-guard. He shows how to perform this maneuver fabulously and reach your opponent’s back during a match.

Arm drag from half-guard

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Publisher Avatar Renzo Gracie posted

WORLD COMBAT CHAMPIONSHIP (1995) - Part 2


When the referee intervened and separated the fighters, Renzo still remained for a few moments pressing Spijkers' neck, and when he released him, he hit his body with a few shoves with his feet. Then, when he got up, he walked away stepping on his opponent's neck. 
 
This action, which generated great controversy after the fight and earned him a warning from the referee, was not intended to harm the physical integrity of the judoka. It was, rather, a purely symbolic act, a response to Spijkers' immense disrespect, with his offensive statements and ridiculous prank calls perpetrated with maniacal insistence the night before. 
 
(Note that, a few seconds after the stomp in the neck, Renzo returned to Spijkers' fallen body and hugged him, apologizing for his attitude. That said, there remains a complementary information: the day after the confrontation, the Dutchman was arrested for assaulting a stewardess on the flight back to his country... “If I had known he was going to attack a woman, I wouldn’t have stepped on his neck, but kicked him in the head,” Renzo said when he learned of the incident.) 
 
In the end, the indomitable fury of that combat became legendary. The way was open towards the title of champion of one of the biggest international MMA tournaments of the period. Now it was time for the next grapplers fight, the only thing separating Renzo from the final showdown of the night against the winner of the strikers bracket.
 
 (to be continued)

A sweep with arm control

In order to shut down the underhook used by Rafael Sapo on the half-guard, Leo Tunico wraps his partner's arm in a whizzer. Sapo takes advantage and traps Tunico's arm. Note that the guard player immediately hip-escapes, repositioning himself under Tunico. This detail is key for Sapo to have the necessary leverage to spin his body and unbalance Tunico with ease, ending the sweep on top -- two to zero.

A sweep with arm control

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Latest Comments

Tatiane Ribeiro commented:

Já assinei uma vez e lá dizia que o acesso era vitalício agora estão me cobrando novamente por quê? Pode consultar minha conta vai ver que me cadastrei a mais de 5 anos atrás

May 24, 2022 13:11

[email protected] commented:

OSS, Thank you Professor. I hung this in our main OPS room in the ARMY and then in LE.
Why do I succeed?
“I succeed because I am willing to do the things you are not. I will fight against the odds. I will sacrifice. I am not shackled by fear, insecurity or doubt. I feel those emotions but drink them in and then swallow them away to the blackness of hell. I am motivated by accomplishment, not pride. Pride consumes the weak and kills their heart from within. If I fall… I will get up. If I am beaten…. I will return. I will never stop getting better. I will never give up…EVER.
That is why I succeed.”

May 22, 2022 12:50

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